How Chinese Clothes Are Poisoning You. If You Notice a Weird Odor, Get Out of That Store!

As the clothing industry has exploded, so have shortcuts. Unfortunately, that sometimes means your clothes may be poisoning you.

2This is particularly true if your clothes have come from China, which frequently makes use of chemicals banned in the European Union and the United States.
As Greenpeace has noted, as many as 20 popular fashion brands use other, detrimental chemicals which don’t only endanger the health of people who buy these clothes, but they also harm the environment.If you ever had a rash that you couldn’t explain, redness, insomnia, or a headache, the main culprit may be your T-shirt, skirt, panties, or your linens with Chinese origin – and the more synthetic clothes you wear, the greater your risk of problems – including dermatitis, lung problems, infertility, and even cancer. As a result, avoid buying products which contain materials like nylon, acetate, acrylic, triacetate, polyester, and rayon.
Dyeing is especially a problem since these colors are toxic, cancerous, and even flammable, and besides being colored, clothes with Chinese origin contain chemicals for resistance to stains, chemicals for reduction of electricity, chemicals against bacteria, unpleasant odors, etc.
As a result, you should avoid clothes manufactured in China and opt for clothes which are made of organic cotton, linen, one of the most potent natural fiber, hemp which is naturally resistant to insects so it doesn’t require fungicides, herbicides, or pesticides during production, silk, a reliable source, however, make sure it’s not processed with synthetic dyes, and organic wool as well.
Several decades ago, the Dupont logo had the following text attached: “Better living through chemistry.” Since then, many of us have come to realize we are living worse in a toxic environment that includes chemically polluted air, water, food, so called “medicine,” and now even clothing.



Dupont had created Rayon, a synthetic fiber used for much of our clothing. So it made sense to team up with the timber industry to ensure hemp was banned in the late 1930s. Rayon and paper could continue to be made by chemically processing wood from trees without competition.

Clothing clings to skin, our largest organ. Toxic chemicals are used excessively for processing garment fibers and also for manufacturing clothes. Asian and third world countries manufacture most textiles and clothes.

But they supply American and other multinational brand name labels with those clothes to yield high profits based on cheap production in regions without even shoddy regulatory agency protection.

Image result for chinese clothing factory spraying chemicals

What’s in your new brand name clothing?

After clothes are made, they are often covered with formaldehyde to keep them from wrinkling or becoming mildewed during shipping. Formaldehyde as a preservative also adds to vaccines’ toxicity.

Several severe allergic reactions to formaldehyde have been reported. It’s no wonder. Investigations have discovered up to 500 times the safe level of formaldehyde in clothing shipped to brand name clothiers form factories in China and Southeast Asia.

There’s also the long-term, negative, cumulative effect on health that is almost impossible to trace back to any source of clothing chemicals. Formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals are used to create synthetic fibers for towels and bedding. Textile toxins are hard to avoid even when you’re out of your clothes.

Another commonly used clothing chemical is nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE). NPE use is restricted in most regions where the big name brand clothes are sold. But there are no restrictions where the clothing factories are located in China and Southeast Asia. 14 big name brands get their clothing from clothing factories using NPE.

Wrinkle free or no-iron should be considered a warning for carcinogenic perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). Teflon for pans is a PFC. Petrochemical dyes are used for fibers in those Asian textile factories that profusely pollute nearby waterways.

Dr. Richard Dixon of the World Wildlife Federation warns about the ecological impact on wildlife: “Urgent action is needed to replace hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives especially in clothing and other consumer products.” (Emphasis added).

Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) are commonly used as detergents in textile industries abroad that are contracted by the multi-national USA and EU-based clothing companies. NPEs break down to form nonylphenol, a toxin with hormone-disrupting properties similar to BPA.

Black clothing and dyes for leathers often contain p-Phenylenediamine (PPD), which can produce allergic reactions. Flame retardants can appear in bedding and nightwear. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and dioxin-producing bleach are used by textile industries. Athletic shoes that contain cloth contain some of these toxins.

These synthetic materials are produced with toxic chemicals, and while they may not produce immediate reactions for most, the long-term accumulation of these toxins added to our polluted air, water, and food can cause numerous health ailments, including cancer. Clothing that doesn’t require ironing or is labeled wrinkle free may even contain perfluorinated chemical (PFC) used to make Teflon – this chemical is known to cause health issues.

Another commonly used clothing or textile factory chemical is nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE). Known as endocrine disruptors, like BPA, nonylphenol have been dumped into adjacent waterways, killing a lot of fish and wildlife. This negative effect on sea wildlife is primarily why various concerned agencies in Europe and America restrict its use. But there are no restrictions where the clothing and textile factories are located in China and Southeast Asia.

Dr. Richard Dixon of the World Wildlife Federation warns about the ecological impact on wildlife: “Urgent action is needed to replace hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives especially in clothing and other consumer products.” (Emphasis added).

Additionally, black clothing and dyes for leathers often contain p-Phenylenediamine (PPD), which can produce allergic reactions. Carcinogenic flame retardants can appear in bedding and nightwear.

Lastly, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and dioxin-producing bleach are used by textile industries, where the materials for clothing are produced. Dioxin is the active ingredient for Agent Orange. Google that if you weren’t around in the 1970s and ’80s.

 

You Don’t Have to Burn All Your Clothes; Just Protect Yourself from Clothing Chemicals

Given the numerous toxins to avoid in daily life, there is no surprise that most people won’t stress about chemicals in clothing. But there are still some simple measures you can take to reduce toxic exposure.

  • If you launder with common supermarket toxic detergents, switch to natural detergents. It will take a few washings to remove the residual toxic detergent ingredients completely.
  • Read clothing labels and try to avoid synthetic materials such as Rayon, Nylon, Polyester, Acrylic, Acetate or Triacetate as much as possible. Also avoid no-iron, wrinkle free and preshrunk items. Basically, try to stay in the 100% pure cotton zone, or hemp clothing if you see any.
  • Wash and dry clothes containing synthetic materials three times before wearing. Some folks add baking soda (not baking powder) to help neutralize new clothing chemicals while using natural detergents, of course. Also, avoid those dryer sheets that prevent clinging unless you can find them without toxic chemicals.
  • Stay away from dry cleaners that use perchloroethylene, commonly known as PERC. There are actually some that don’t. Find them or forget dry cleaning. Even used clothing purchased from thrift stores may be sprayed with some chemical before they’re put up for sale. Wash and dry them at least once.
Sources for this article include:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Home

http://digitaljournal.com/article/310703

http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-living/articles/91967.aspx

http://www.greenpeace.org

http://www.greenpeace.org

http://www.theunknownbutnothidden.com

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